Figure 1: Basic T Block, Rotated and Variation
Figure 1: Basic T Block, Rotated and Variation
This simple block is made from two sizes of half square triangles. A half square triangle is a square divided along one diagonal into two triangles, usually one dark and one light. The basic block is based on a nine patch grid, see Figure 1.
 
To draft the block, divide into nine squares. Use one square as the basis for the small triangle and four squares for the larger. If sewing by hand you can cut up a paper drawing and use to make templates. For rotary cutting add 7⁄8in to the finished size of the square. Cut a square this measurement then cut in half diagonally to make two triangles. You can use the quick piecing method for making these triangles too the measurements stay the same.
 
Figure 2: Rotation and Edge to Edge
Figure 2: Rotation and Edge to Edge
 
Four blocks joined with the stalk of the T in the centre form the T block. See Figure 1
 
There are many ways of varying this block; Figure 1 shows the base of the T cutaway. This variation changes the as it is not possible to make four separate little blocks due to the large square in the centre. The corner areas of the T are shown as small triangles and squares but could be pieced as above with larger triangles. This variation gives a larger centre area for a quilting pattern.
 
In Figure 2 the basic block has been rotated so that two face to the centre and two towards the edge of the block. This creates an interesting central shape, almost like a H. It is good practise to experiment with your blocks in this way as all sorts of interesting secondary pattern can develop. You can photocopy the block a few times and then cut up and rearrange. If you like the pattern quickly make a copy or glue it onto some spare paper, as the chances are you may never repeat it!
 
When the blocks are placed edge to edge, again secondary patterns appear. This can be of benefit or not as you may find the pattern detracts from the look you were aiming for. Figure 2 shows the blocks from Figure 1 set edge to edge.
 
The green blocks are more solid looking and appear to be bursting out of the quilt top, while the brown blocks have much more diagonal movement. Either setting would be ideal for the centre of a small medallion quilt top and by adding a few borders you would soon have a small throw or lap quilt