Figure 1: Block Construction and complete block
Figure 1: Block Construction and complete block

First published by the Ladies Art Company in 1922, this block is a seven-patch design. It is different from many seven-patch designs (so called because of the underlying grid) in that the central section is 3⁄7 wide. This creates a deep semicircle on the rectangle, which is quite unusual.

To draft the block divide your basic square into seven and mark out the straight lines. Use compasses to draw the arcs on the corner of the squares. The arc on the rectangle is not an exact circle and so cannot be drawn with compasses. I found the best plan was to use a large cake tin or plate and move it until it crossed the corners of the rectangle. You can of course draw by eye, or by folding the rectangle in half and drawing half of the curve.

Figure 2: Edge to edge layout
Figure 2: Edge to edge layout

We have provided a template for a 12in block. These are templates for hand-piecing and need seam allowances added. Draw round the template exactly on the WS of the fabric making sure to keep the corners sharp. Add the seam allowance before cutting out. If you are working by machine, you can use a brass wheel with a 1⁄4in radius. A fine pencil is placed in the centre and the wheel is rolled round a shape to add the seam allowance to the template. As the seam line is drawn on the WS of your fabric you can use this to sew along. Cut out exactly and piece using the fabric edges as a guide carefully pinning the curves in place. See Figure 1 for piecing and construction details.

If you were concerned about piecing the curves you could appliqué the curved edge in place. In this case the background shape would be a whole square. Cut a cardboard template the exact size of the block. Then sew a row of running stitch in the seam allowance of the curved edge. Place over the card template and pull gently to gather the curve and then press. Lay in position on the corner of the square and appliqué the curved edge in place.

When the blocks are placed edge to edge a repeating pattern appears which echoes the centre of the block. See Figure 2. To continue the theme the following blocks are both crown blocks, although the blocks here have no connecting style except for the names.

King David's Crown & King's Crown
King David's Crown & King's Crown