Figure 1: Block construction
Figure 1: Block construction

Lincolns Platform, was first published by the Ladies Art Company in 1898. Indicating that women, though not allowed to vote, had strong opinions about politics.

Abraham Lincoln was the sixteenth president of the United States of America. The son of a Kentucky frontiersman, Lincoln had to struggle for a living and for learning. Born on February 12th 1809, Lincoln made extraordinary efforts to attain knowledge while working on a farm, splitting rails for fences, and keeping store at New Salem, Illinois. He was a captain in the Black Hawk War, spent eight years in the Illinois legislature, and rode the circuit of courts for many years. He married Mary Todd, and they had four boys, only one of whom lived to maturity. He won the Republican nomination for President in 1860.

As President, he rallied most of the northern Democrats to the Union cause. On January 1, 1863, he issued the Emancipation Proclamation that declared forever free those slaves within the Confederacy. Lincoln never let the world forget that the Civil War involved an even larger issue. This he stated most movingly in dedicating the military cemetery at Gettysburg in the famous Gettysburg address. Lincoln won re-election in 1864, as Union military triumphs heralded an end to the war. On Good Friday, April 14, 1865, Lincoln was assassinated at Ford's Theatre in Washington.

Figure 2: The edge to edge layout
Figure 2: The edge to edge layout

Quilt historians would dispute that this block can be inspired by or related to Lincoln in any way but a block must get its name from somewhere and maybe there is a link that has been lost with the passage of time.

This is a seven patch design. This means the block is divided into seven squares across and seven squares deep. The shapes can then be drawn on. It is easiest to draw if you use 7 or 14 inches as your block size, then the maths is quite simple. The templates are for a 12in block, which would be more difficult to draft. Enlarge with photocopier, cut them out and stick to the bottom of your ruler with one edge level with the side of the ruler. You can then line up the other side on the edge of the fabric and cut along the edge of the ruler.

The block is pieced following the block piecing diagram shown in Figure 1.

If you make all the blocks the same and have an edge to edge layout you create the appearance of fake sashing as shown in Figure 2.