Figure 1: Block diagram
Figure 1: Block diagram

This is a simple four patch design but the interest comes when it is repeated. A single block on its own looks a bit strange with the star in the bottom left but when you put the blocks edge to edge another coloured star appears and the edges of the individual blocks are lost in the overall design.

For a four patch design, any block size that is divisible by four will work well. If you want to use an unusual size like 8 3⁄4in for some reason, one method is to draw a square that size on graph paper and fold into four to calculate the sizes needed. Make sure you press the folds down neatly or your grid will not be square.

Figure 2: Blocks tessellate to create more stars
Figure 2: Blocks tessellate to create more stars

Measure the sizes and add seam allowances all round or cut the pattern apart to make actual templates. If you used a square of freezer paper you could cut apart and iron onto the WS of the fabric. Sew along the edges of the paper without worrying about exact seam allowances.

Here are the cutting sizes for a 12in block.

  • Small square 2in
  • Large square 3 1⁄2in
  • Triangle 3 7⁄8in cut in half diagonally.

The four patch sections can be assembled by quick strip piecing using 2in strips cut from the green and gold. The triangles could be quick pieced by placing two squares 3 7⁄8in RS together and sewing 1⁄4in either side of the diagonal and then cutting apart.

Figure 1 shows the piecing diagram for the block. When the blocks are pieced edge to edge the second lime green star appears in Figure 2.

If I was piecing this top I would suggest that you add a pieced border on the top and right hand side to complete the star points in those rows. The top border will be the same as the bottom row of the block with four patches and triangles. The right hand border would be the same as the left column in Figure 1, again with four patches and triangles. This would make all the stars complete and would really puzzle everyone when they tried to work out the block pattern.

Figure 3: Other Indiana blocks
Figure 3: Other Indiana blocks

When researching this block I also came across some other blocks from Indiana and they are shown in Figure 3. I think youll agree I chose the easy option for you!