By continuing to use this site, you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more

Bag Wadding

All Topics | Latest Posts

Search for:  in Thread Title in  
Brenda in OZ12/02/2017 06:37:56
avatar
480 forum posts
155 photos
33 articles

I have been busy designing and making yet more bags and experimenting with different fabrics and notions.

I was given a sample of fusible foam bag wadding and made up a large tote bag to try it out. At first I thought it was great but as I progressed with the bag I wasn't sure. Does anyone have any comments either for or against and has anyone tried washing it? I suppose I need to "road test" it. I would be pleased to hear your reactions.

rosemary Rosenfeld12/02/2017 18:05:39
avatar
Moderator
5619 forum posts
1548 photos
13 articles

Hi Brenda.....I have some but not used it yet ..... so I will be interested in the answers as well! Rx

Jayne12/02/2017 18:56:43
avatar
675 forum posts
118 photos

I have some fusible wadding, I'm not sure mine is specifically bag wadding though. I have made some blocks for cushions at home and I'm not over impressed yet, but then I still have to quilt them.

I used some for a machine quilting course I did at the end of last year, it was very useful then as it saved me pinning everything. I found it difficult to get the top fused without wrinkles even some ones, I'll see when it's been heavily quilted, the cushions are just techniques practices.

Brenda in OZ12/02/2017 23:58:21
avatar
480 forum posts
155 photos
33 articles

You are quite right Jayne, sometimes it is difficult to fuse the two together without getting wrinkles (I have too many of those on my face!).

I have used a number of different types of fusible wadding with a mixture of results. This particular one, I think they call it "R Form" in the UK, is foam and feels like a piece of kitchen sponge! It sews quite easily and you don't necessarily need a walking foot.

I think it will sit better if you quilt it or better still if you "quilt as you go". The bag is looking a little too "fixed" in that the look is very stiff but the feel is softer. At least the bag stands up on it's own! I'll plod on.

Margaret S13/02/2017 09:34:34
avatar
3884 forum posts
691 photos
Hi Brenda

I have both the fusible and non fusible versions. It is very expensive here in the UK.

I started to make a bag with the non fusible. As you say it looks very structured. I am not sure that I like the 'heaviness' of it, hence I haven't finished it. The only bonus,as you say, seems to be that it stands up!

Margaret
Beryl Hedley13/02/2017 10:48:44
821 forum posts
145 photos

Brenda. I have not used the foam wadding but I did see a demo on TV . I didn't know what to make of it. it did look so stiff . However the demonstrator didn't have any problems either sewing or quilting it. They did say there was no problem with washing.

Not sure this is any help to you . Hope you get sorted .Looking forward to seeing your finished bag.

Beryl

Marian C13/02/2017 11:38:37
58 forum posts
24 photos

It's called Bosal In-R-Form fusible foam stabiliser and is available at Hobbycraft for £10. The size is 18x58 inches, and so is on the expensive side because you would only get 2 or 3 bags out of it. I have used it on one bag, and it gives a very structured shape to it so that it stands up on its own, but is also very flexible in use. However, I won't buy it again as it is too expensive. I recently bought a bolt of Heat n Bond fusible fleece from A****n and will use that instead, perhaps with some interfacing if it needs to be stiffer - at £29.40 for 20 inches x 11 yards ( 50.8 cm x 10metres) it works out at £5.80 per metre, whereas the Bosal works out at £14.74 per metre.

Marian

Brenda in OZ19/02/2017 02:04:56
avatar
480 forum posts
155 photos
33 articles

Well the bag is finished! It's a pure experiment using a panel for the front and fabrics from my stash for the rest.

>Size is 15 x 16 (inches) with a five inch base.>

3.jpg 4.jpg

Designing was a challenge because I had to anticipate how I could work with the wadding. I thought turning through would be a problem so I added the lining whilst the bag was flat then finished the sides with binding. The second was that the wadding was very thick and could not easily be included in the seams and the third was that if the bag was to be folded for storage then it would probably have a permanent memory crease! >>

You can see that by folding the base inwards at the bottom the bag lies flat when not in use. The bag has a flap stitched in with the lining that flips over to form the base when you want to use the bag.>>

CONCLUSIONS'>>

The wadding is easy to work with, is lightweight, retains its shape and fuses easy but you have to take care that the fabric doesn't crease as you fuse. The bag has good insulation properties - ideal for picnics.>>

On the down side it's expensive and limits both design and construction methods and lacks that natural look.>>

I have some left and maybe will use it again at some time.

>Brenda in OZ>

rosemary Rosenfeld19/02/2017 08:04:40
avatar
Moderator
5619 forum posts
1548 photos
13 articles

It does look good though! I still haven't used mine yet, now I'm not sure whether my idea will work or not!

I love the panel!

Best Rosemary

Margaret S19/02/2017 10:06:34
avatar
3884 forum posts
691 photos
I love that bag Brenda. The fabric panel is great.

A friend uses her bag regularly and that foam has got a bit softer.

Margaret

All Topics | Latest Posts

Please login to post a reply.

Magazine Locator

Want the latest issue of British Patchwork & Quilting? Use our magazine locator links to find your nearest stockist!

Find British Patchwork & Quilting

 

Latest Forum Posts
Support Our Partners
Crafting Live
lewis and irene
Sewing Quarter
The Cotton Patch
Janome
bredons
C&T publishing
Search Press
SewAndSo
Sarik
Contact us

Got a patchwork or quilting problem? Looking for a phone number or email address to ask someone for help? Click here to find the right person

Digital Back Issues

Popular Patchwork Digital Back Issues