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Jayne11/02/2016 08:51:38
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Yes Winnie, I know what you mean, I tried one at the FOQ last year and it was sooooo comfy and easy to use. There is no way I could afford one or to give over a room in the house for it either... But that's what dreams are for, isn't it?

Jayne x

 

Edited By Katy on 12/02/2016 09:38:41

Fay Morris11/02/2016 09:25:12
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Hello everyone

I have two suggestions -

1, there are ordinary sewing machines which are much longer and therefore there is more space for the bigger quilts

2. If you have a guild and one of the members is lucky enough to have a room or shed for a long-arm machine and is ready to house if for the group, then the guild together can buy a machine and arrangements can be made for people to learn to use it and share the time on it. The group can also pay a rental for the room in which the machines "lives" to cover the inconveniences to the homeowner. In our group there are 3 ladies who own a long-arm machine together but in our case they get paid for quilting for other people - not specifically members of our guild.

These days if I want to make a large quilt I do so in stages, i.e. quilt strips of quilt and then put it together - somehow I can manage the joining part. I did this with the quilt I made from the friendship quilt swap a few years ago. Notice the green strips between the rows.

Best wishes

Fayat guild meeting.jpg

 

 

Edited By Katy on 12/02/2016 09:39:01

Winnie the B.O.L.B11/02/2016 09:59:48
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That sounds like a great idea - unfortunately, no-one I know has the space and there aren't enough of us in our group to afford to buy a machine but for any group who can do it, it would be wonderful.

As for your solution - yes, that's what I do as well - I work out the design to include some narrow sashing strips which allow me to do "chunks" of it in Quilt As You Go form. However, I still can't even manage the FMQ on these sizes!! I still do outline/stitch in the ditch etc. It would still be lovely though to able to be able to do both FMQ and a whole quilt in one go!!!

As you say Jayne, we can always dream!

Winnie x

Edited By Katy on 12/02/2016 09:39:23

Winnie the B.O.L.B11/02/2016 13:08:41
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i posted this on Chat (???) without realising there was already a Thread!! My problem seems to be getting an even stitch length. I am managing the principle of "not turning the fabric" and can move side to side/up and down - can even make circles but just can't seem to get even stitch length. Any tips?

I'm off to watch the Youtube and suggested websites to see if I can get any more help - I have been trying to work form a Harriet Hargreaves book on Machine Quilting but not enough tips, I am finding.

Winnie xx

Winnie the B.O.L.B11/02/2016 13:44:14
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This is a copy of my original post on UFO Zapping!!!

I am "determined"(???) to try to master this. I am fine/OK with ordinary "outline" quilting with either my walking foot or my clear plastic open toed one although I find large quilts very difficult with my ordinary machine. I tend to "cheat" a bit with those and include some QAYG sized blocks in my designs!!! Stitching in the Ditch isn't all that easy either - it sounds as if it should be BUT!!!

If I had both the room and the finance, I would invest in a long arm quilter - unfortunately, I have neither!!

Maybe my stitch length control just needs lots more practise!!

Does anyone know if there are any workshops on FMQ at the FOQ?

Winnie xx

Katy11/02/2016 13:47:52
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I don't think the workshops are published yet, but there certainly will be!

Winnie the B.O.L.B11/02/2016 15:33:51
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Thanks Katy - I'll keep an eye out - do you have to book in advance?

Winnie x

Stereochild11/02/2016 18:29:45
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Thank you Katy for the update - don't you hate it when the computer doesn't compute! grrrr...

Winnie you have reminded me that I still need to get my sewing machine quilted out, so to speak. I don't have the sewing feet I really need for my machine, Maybe that would be what I need to help me sew better. But keep on with the FMQ. I am always amazed at the work you see on the quilts at the FOQ - I try and tell myself that once upon a time they were rubbish too! lol cheeky

 

Edited By Katy on 12/02/2016 09:39:53

Winnie the B.O.L.B11/02/2016 19:10:12
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Letia - although we were talking mainly about FMQ before , for straight line quilting - say "in the ditch" - I have always found a walking foot the best thing ever invented. However, the models made for certain specific machines can be very expensive - depending on your "brand". If you find that to be the case for your machine - and I truly recommend buying one - investigate the generic models on the market. They can cost even less than half price. If you do look into it and can't find it, I can recommend a particular Edinburgh dealer, David Drummond, who has a regular full page advert in the magazine. I bought them for 3 of my group members and the price was excellent; they are not quite the same quality as my Bernina one but certainly excellent value fro money. Same applied to other generic feet - an open toe quilting foot, for example. If you are thinking of buying a 1/4" quilting foot, make sure it's really what you need. When I bought an extra, lighter weight machine to take to my group sessions, my supplier explained to me that on modern machines, the 9mm wide feed (the space between the feed dogs) that most of them have, is great for all sorts of fancier stitching, even simply for very wide zig-zag (older machines tend to have a 7mm one). However, a 1/4" foot doesn't provide the same grip between fabric and foot with 9mm that it gets from 7mm. So, if your machine needle allows you sideways adjustment on your needle, he believes you are better off using a standard width foot and moving your needle to line up a 1/4" seam allowance. Hope that explanation makes sense and helps you to "quilt out" your machine.

Winnie xx

Edited By Katy on 12/02/2016 09:40:16

Brenda in OZ12/02/2016 10:31:22
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I invested in a "Supreme Slider" for free motion quilting and I swear by it. It's a non friction mat with a sticky back that you place over the bed of your machine to cover your sewing area. It has a hole for the needle to pass through and your quilt just glides over the top!

The pink back isn't permanently sticky, you just give it a wipe with a damp cloth if you get any threads etc sticking to it. I've had mine for a couple of years and used it many times.

They have a web site http://www.freemotionslider.com/ where you can learn all about it.

Can't remember how much I paid for it but knowing me it wouldn't be that much. I would say less than 20 pounds.

Brenda in OZ

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